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Something to Think About

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

Steve Sauder is president of Emporia's Radio Stations, Inc. the owners of KVOE-AM 1400, Country 101.7 and Mix 104.9. Steve has been in a leadership position with ERS, Inc., since 1987.

July 30, 2014

Concerning the race for Governor of Kansas statehouse watchdog Martin Hawver wrote on Monday, “The financial corner of the governor’s race took a sharp turn this afternoon when the Republican team of Sam Brownback & Jeff Colyer revealed in its campaign finance report that it may or may not have out-raised Democrats Paul Davis & Jill Docking.”

Really?

May or may not have?

Tuesday’s Topeka Capital Journal’s headline says “Davis campaign donations top Brownback’s in 2014.”

What is going on?

In actual new donations during 2014 the Davis/Docking team outraised Brownback/Colyer by some$398,000, but the Governor’s team used a loan from Lt. Governor Colyer, made to the campaign of $500,000, to push their total on the report, filed Monday, slightly ahead of their Democrat opponent.

Even more interesting is the Brownback campaign evidently pulled the same stunt at the end of 2013 when Colyer again loaned the campaign half a million dollars. That was done on New Year’s Eve. That loan was repaid on January the second. Colyer’s $500,000 was on the books just long enough to let it show up on the Brownback 2013 Campaign Finance Report thus making the report show their campaign receiving considerably more in contributions compared to Davis.

Perception must be more important than the truth!

Or, is that deception?

It will be interesting to see if Governor Brownback speaks about this or just ignores it. I’m thinking that answer is obvious.

Locally, with a Primary Election next Tuesday the only real excitement is the Peggy Mast – Jeff Freeman contest for the Republican House nomination. Mast and Freeman are scheduled to appear on KVOE tomorrow morning at 10:06. That should be very interesting.

Freemen has been full of surprises maybe he’ll have one tomorrow!

The winner will run against Democrat Teresa Briggs and Independent Bill Otto in November.

Remember, voting is a privilege; hope to see you at the polls next week.

I’m Steve Sauder.

July 23, 2014

Open Letter to Governor Sam Brownback

          Dear Mr. Governor,

          I am confused by your tax policy in Kansas.

          I understand your plan is to attract new business to the state by cutting taxes. I am aware of the 25% cut in individual income tax rates in 2012 and the repeal of taxes on sole proprietorships and pass through businesses that same year. And, I note in 2013 even lower rates were adopted.

          The result I understand from June 2013 to June 2014 has been an 11% drop in revenue, some growth in the economy, but not really anything to brag about.

          You said last week your plan will take more time.

          O.K., that makes sense, but how much time and how much damage to our state’s reputation will occur while we wait?

          My big question is about public relations.

          Using Google I ask the question: What are the best states in which to do business.

          With the drastic measures you’ve taken in Kansas I expected theSunflower State to be at the top of all the lists, but it wasn’t. Fact is it was hard to find Kansas anywhere but in the middle of the pack.

          Forbes even printed an article entitled: What’s the Matter WithKansas and It’s Tax Cuts? It Can’t Do Math.

          Not very complimentary, would you agree?

          The Tax Foundation listing of best business climates by state rankedKansas 26th and not even in the top ten for taxes.

          With some help, I did find buried on the Kansas Department of Commerce website a report from Pollina Corporate Real Estate. They ranked Kansas as the fifth best state to do business and also praised you and your tax policies.

          I am shocked. With Kansas’ massive tax cuts designed to attract attention and new business one would assume there would be a tremendous public relations effort to sell our state’s unique tax opportunity.

          Unfortunately, most of what I was able to find was not very complimentary to our state.

          So Governor, are you doing a good job of selling Kansas?

          If your answer is “yes” please help me understand how it works.

                                      Sincerely,

                                      Steve Sauder

July 16, 2014

The day after the All Star break for major league baseball and the final 68 games of the baseball season start Friday for the Royals. Now I’m not saying I’m obsessed with the Royals, but I do admit I’m not sure what I’ll do with my extra time before Friday.

          It’s no secret that sports play an important part in my make up – too much? Well that’s my problem.

          Baseball season is so much fun because it lasts a long time and there more highs and lows than in any other sport. Everyone thrives on feeling good whether they like sports or not. My highs from a Royals victory are extremely obvious and my disgust when they lose ugly – well they are hard to miss.

          So you can partially understand my dismay on Saturday – a day I spent not playing golf as I’d planned because I was under the weather – when I discovered the Royals and Tigers game would not be televised. A blackout in both Detroit and KC thanks to the Major League Baseball Network.

          Amazingly being forced to listen on the radio turned into a joy despite the Royals loss. Denny and Brian were really good. I knew that – heck Denny Matthews is in the Hall of Fame – but not watching seemed so unfair especially as it related to my ongoing pity party that day.

          Brain Cashman has a song on his CD - Talkin’ Baseball entitled “I Saw it on the Radio.” Legendary Vin Scully is the announcer and that memory plus actually listening to the game in my recliner brought days gone by when listening to the Kansas City Athletics on the radio was my close friend.

          I saw it on the radio – that’s a cool thing.

          So, how about those Royals?

          Two games over 500 with a 48 and 46 record – best since 2003 at the break. The Royals need at least 90 wins to have a shot at the playoffs. That’s 42 wins and just 26 losses the rest of they way.

          Last year the Royals were the best team in baseball after the All Start break. They will need to be close to that again this season.

          So, if you see me on Saturday and I have a smile on my face and some pep in my step it’s a good bet the Royals beat the Red Sox the night before. Our Ron Thomas might be just the opposite because his Red Sox would have lost compounding their bad season where they are in last place after winning it all last year!

          It’s baseball folks and if you have the fever you just have to enjoy it. I certainly do. Go Royals!

          I’m Steve Sauder

July 9, 2014

An Addiction is the continued repetition of a behavior despite adverse consequences, according to Wikipedia.

Addictions we can conclude are for the most part not good.

Now consider this: Analyses of data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions show that people who begin drinking before age 15 are four times more likely to develop alcohol dependence during their lifetime than those who began drinking at age 21 or later. This has even been shown for identical twins who share the same genetics, but begin drinking at different ages.

Underage drinkers of alcohol are 4 times more likely to become addicted than adults!

KVOE has been running commercials from the Regional Prevention Center recently talking about alcohol and minors. These ads repeat things parents say to justify letting their kids drink like – I drank when I was that age, It’s only beer, We want our kids to be liked. These ads also talk about the legal ramifications of providing alcohol to minors. Good spots with great information.

The potential for a lifetime addiction associated with underage drinking makes a strong case for helping kids stay clear from booze.

So, how you ask can this happen with so many opportunities for kids to drink?

Amazingly the best and most successful manner by which youngsters can be convinced to wait until they are legal to drink alcohol involves their parents!

Parents are the most influential people in the lives of children. Kids are programmed to please their parents and react to requests coming from of their parents. This is a fact!

So, if you don’t want your underage child to drink – try asking them not to do so. Talk with them. Educate yourself so you can make the case. Facts like 2/3 of kids making mostly A’s and B’s don’t drink while over half the kids failing do drink are compelling.

Consider that over 5,000 youth die annually from vehicle crashes, homicides and suicides that involve underage drinking.

And probably the most important thing parents can do for their children is be good role models – especially as it relates to the use of alcohol. This doesn’t mean parents can’t drink or shouldn’t drink in front of their kids, but it does mean not making alcohol the center piece of their lives.

Probably said enough, but if this made you uncomfortable that’s good. Anyway you cut it underage drinking has no redeeming qualities and lots of perils so why encourage it? Why?

I’m Steve Sauder.

July 2, 2014

Ever feel like not working. That was me yesterday, so I didn’t. Well I did not do much. My Something to Think About reflects my lack of effort. You could say it is a “throw away” piece.It’s about toilet paper. It came in an email about “Toilet Paper Trivia,” so these facts must be true.

The first recorded use of toilet paper was in 6th Century China.
By the 14th Century, the Chinese government was mass-producing it.
Packaged toilet paper wasn’t sold in the United States until 1857.
The man who introduced packaged TP to the U.S., had his name printed on every sheet.
Global toilet paper demand uses nearly 30,000 trees every day. That’s 10 million trees a year.

It wasn’t until 1935 that a manufacturer was able to promise “Splinter-Free Toilet Paper.”
Seven percent of Americans admit to stealing rolls of toilet paper in hotels.

Americans use an average of 8.6 sheets of toilet paper per trip.
The average roll has 333 sheets.
In many Western European countries, bidets are seen as preferable to toilet paper.

In 1973 Johnny Carson caused a toilet paper shortage. He said as a joke that there was a shortage, which there wasn’t, until everyone believed him and ran out to buy up the supply. It took three weeks for some stores to get more stock.
In 1996, President Clinton passed a “Toilet Paper Tax” of 6 cents per roll, which is still in effect today.
The Pentagon uses, on average, 666 rolls of toilet paper per day.

The most expensive toilet paper in the world is from Portuguese brand Renova it’s three-ply, perfumed, costs $3 per roll and comes in several colors including black, red, blue and green.
Beyoncé uses only red Renova toilet paper.  Kris Jenner uses only the black Renova toilet paper.

If you hang your toilet paper so you can pull it from the bottom, you’re considered more intelligent than someone who pulls it from the top.
When asked what necessity they would bring to a desert island, 49% of people said toilet paper before food.

Toilet paper before food? That’s like putting the cart before the……naw I’m Steve Sauder.

June 25, 2014

If this was the Breakfast Quiz and the question was “who first coined the name – The Flint Hills?” Would you have an answer?

I do because my friend Wikipedia always has lots of interesting facts.

Explorer Zebulon Pike gets the credit for the Flint Hills and also for Pike’s Peak!

More Flint Hills facts after telling you about the Gator Rally Bobbi and I participated in earlier this month. The Rally hosted by Prairie Land Partners and their dedicated staff is a unique opportunity we have because we live near the beautiful Flint Hills.

On Thursday, our night, some 27 Gators took off from the cattle pens 16 miles south on the Kansas Turnpike. Four incredible hours later we had traversed nearly 40 miles over some of the most gorgeous land anywhere.

We were lucky because the recent rains added vibrant colors to this amazing place.   

The Flint Hills historically known as Bluestem Pastures or Blue Stem Hills, is a region in southeast Kansas named for the abundant residual flint (or chert) eroded from the bedrock that lies near or at the surface. The region includes a band of hills in eastern Kansas stretching into north-central Oklahoma, it has the most dense coverage of intact tallgrass prairie in North America.

The highest point in the Flint Hills is Butler County High Point, with an elevation of 1680 feet. The Flint Hills span 199 miles by 81 miles.

Our journey paused for dinner near Teterville and then Teter Rock for pictures. Where’s Teterville you ask? O, that’s just west of Thrall.

The trip back to the cattle pens led us through what my dad used to call the “oil patch.” I’m not sure we were on any of his old leases, but the smell and the sights and sounds of oil being pumped from this rocky soil was nostalgic for me.

The Gator Rally is a big undertaking for Prairie Land Partners encompassing 5 nights with stunning results. Not only did dozens of people get to see the Flint Hills up close and personal; three organizations – Big Brothers/Big Sisters; the Senior Center and C.A.L.M. – shared over $37,000 from the event. Our hosts deserve a big thank you.

Last thought: Let’s call it 40 miles in a Gator and my butt was sore, my back worse, my eyes swollen from the dust and my face covered with what was close to mud. My thought -  If 40 miles in Gator felt like this - what must 200 miles on a bike on gravel feel like?

I now have even greater respect for both our magnificent Flint Hills and the DK 200 riders.

I’m Steve Sauder with “Something to Think About.”