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Something to Think About

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

Steve Sauder is president of Emporia's Radio Stations, Inc. the owners of KVOE-AM 1400, Country 101.7 and Mix 104.9. Steve has been in a leadership position with ERS, Inc., since 1987.

September 30, 2015

Emporia’s Memory Walk to end Alzheimer’s Disease will be this Sunday at the Lyon County Fair Grounds. Registration starts at 1:30 with the Walk starting at 2:30. Prior to the Walk a social time will be held for friends to meet and talk.

     Often we hear that someone is suffering from Dementia and we think that’s not as serious as Alzheimer’s, but we’d be wrong. Both are serious and neither is a normal part of aging. The following may help you understand the difference.

  •  “Dementia” is a term that has replaced a more out-of-date word, “senility,” to refer to cognitive changes with advanced age.
  • Dementia includes a group of symptoms, the most prominent of which is memory.

A good analogy to the term dementia is “fever.” Fever refers to an elevated temperature, indicating that a person is sick. But it does not give any information about what is causing the sickness.

In the same way, dementia means that there is something wrong with a person’s brain, but it does not provide any information about what is causing the memory or cognitive difficulties.

Dementia is not a disease; it is the clinical presentation or symptoms of a disease. There are many possible causes of dementia. They are degenerative diseases of the brain that get worse over time.

The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s, accounting for as many as 70-80% of all cases of dementia.

Approximately 5.3 million Americans currently live with Alzheimer's Disease.

          Emporia’s Memory Walk is Sunday at the Fairgrounds. Much progress has been made in Alzheimer’s research, but much if left to be done. The number of victims is massive and for each victim there is a caregiver and family. Please attend the Walk and also offer prayers for the people affected by these cruel diseases.

          I’m Steve Sauder

October 14, 2015

I just called him “Calhoun.” We met through friend Jeff Hawes when we were all at Wentworth Military Academy Summer Camp when I was ten years old.

William Kenneth Calhoun III died this past Friday at home in Lawrence. He was 71.

          On KVOE News over the weekend I called him an “icon” in Emporia for my generation. Calhoun was involved in more things outside his field of endeavor than anyone I know.

          As the news of his death started to sink in it hit me that while we had allowed Calhoun to fix many things locally we had made a big mistake. We should have forced Kenny Calhoun to Topeka or even Washington because of his unique ability to force budget considerations and planning.

          Early work for Calhoun was at Newman’s Department Store the family business on Commercial Street. He kept it afloat for a long time through rough times for retailers and finally gracefully closed it out.

          While a Commercial Street merchant Calhoun led almost single-handedly the project to revitalize downtown Emporia. Our downtown street design was Ken’s and he was the ringleader in getting rid of parking meters and building parking lots.

          They called Calhoun the “Mayor” at Lake Kahola. The lake was special to the Calhoun’s and Ken kept his finger in Kahola business right up through the sale from Emporia to the leaseholders.

          Calhoun was president of the Emporia Country Club 3 times – 1974, 1998, and 2012. Guess what – he wasn’t president because things were rosy. Again he was a fixer helping find ways to keep the club open.

          Calhoun attended Culver Military School in Mexico, Missouri and later Kansas University and loved his reunions and old classmates.

          Calhoun was a KU fan and Lady Hornet Basketball supporter.

          Before moving to Lawrence three years ago Ken managed the Emporia Community Foundation for 12 years of magnificent growth.

          Calhoun loved Emporia but moved to Lawrence to finish his life and find some new challenges. His wife Judy told me at the time of Calhoun’s death he was chairing a finance committee and because it was budget time and he was so excited.

          Seems to me what I need to do now is warn St. Peter about Calhoun. Ol’ Pete better have his heaven’s Mission Statement up to date, goals set and budget balanced because Kenny Calhoun will soon be looking over his shoulder!

          RIP Ken, you were one of a kind.

          I’m Steve Sauder

October 2, 2015 - Guest STTA by Roger & Sherry Ferguson

Back in the Day…………

Why CAN’T we afford this new North Lyon County Consolidated School?  Our ancestors built schools for us.

 A quick trip to the Lyon County Archive provided us with the following information about Northern Heights High School (NHHS).

 “Due to the loss of students in the communities of Bushong, Allen, Admire and Miller schools the communities started discussing consolidation.  A vote on consolidation was held in May, 1955, and carried.  In September, 1955, an issue of $375,000 in bonds for construction and equipping a new high school carried.  The location was chosen and construction started in April 1956.”

So what did our ancestors build in terms of today’s money?  Using an inflation calculator ( http://www.bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm ) we find the school they built would cost $3,334,645.52 or 3 million dollars today.

The current proposed construction cost is 39 million dollars.   We don’t hesitate to say “back in the day” our parents and our grandparents would have voted against this proposal.  They were busy building schools back then, not a “Palace in the Pasture.” 

Recently editorial articles have been published describing the great education NHHS alumni have received and how it gave them morals to succeed.   An education that made them the people they are today.  We hope one of those moral values is that spending within our means DOES provide a quality education.  Be proud to make a fiscally responsible decision for future generations by Voting ‘NO’ on Oct. 7th.    

Roger and Sherry Ferguson

North Lyon County Residents

October 1, 2015 - Guest STTA by Nancy Wells

Click Here to read Nancy Well's Something to Think About

 

September 22, 2015

 

          On September 2, my topic was the proposal for a new school facility in Northern Lyon County. You will probably remember I started by stating that I was not a patron in the district and that I understood some would feel like this was none of my business. I accepted that and shared my observations.

          My thoughts were that the proponents of the new school had done a good job of trying to inform the voters. That there was a list of economic reasons to build the new facility including: gigantic transportation savings; classroom size efficiency that included an actual fifth grade example that would result annual savings in the $50 thousand range; energy savings and more.

          The reaction to my effort was a number of “thank you” notes from supporters and a few comments from others.

          There have been letters in the Gazette both for and against the bond issue. This has the looks of a tough decision that would be made by an informed electorate.

          Then Saturday I opened up my Gazette. The paper’s Editor& Publisher decided to weigh in on the bond election.

          Chris Walker is opposed suggesting “the tax increase would be insane.” He talked about people possibility being “shunned” if they voted no and let all know he’s voting no on October 7th.

          Chris is certainly within his rights to oppose the bond issue and say so using his mode, but something you may or may not know makes me wonder about his motives. 

          While the Walkers are USD 251 District patrons I think their children attend school elsewhere - makes one wonder.

If the USD 251 bond passes more Emporia kids will likely consider the new, smaller and closer school. That could raise my taxes. 

          North Lyon County voters have a major decision to make. Good Luck!         

          I’m Steve Sauder

September 16, 2015

Very impressed was my reaction to Emporia Board of Education’s applicants for the open spot on their board when Brent Windsor left.

          No less than six people applied – that was awesome! Thank you to: Jennifer Dalton; Shilo Good; Melissa Reed; Jeff Lutes; Iona Moore and the eventual selectee: Colleen Mitchell.

          Your willingness to serve was amazing. Especially given the difficulties facing K-12, public education in Kansas. Running a school district has long been hard work, but when you add in the messes our Kansas legislature and governor have created you have to wonder why anyone would want to serve?

          Look at the challenges being faced in North and South Lyon County and Chase County and you get a better understanding of what our school leaders are facing. Thanks to all that serve and thanks again to the applicants for the USD 253 opening.

          And, wow! What a great selection in Colleen Mitchell! Over thirty years of teaching experience and to say she was a good teacher would be a massive understatement! She was the Kansas Teacher of the Year in 2013 and a Master Teacher as well. She’s also part of a family that does business in our community thus giving her appreciation for things like property taxes and expenses.

          Colleen won’t be the only former teacher on the Board, but adding her experience will help non-teachers better understand. And, she too will get an education as to the challenges faced by school administrators. This has to be a win/win situation.

          Why would anyone want to serve on a public school Board of Education?

While local control is always talked about our state and federal governing bodies have perfected the art of mandating programs or requirements, but often without proper funding?

          Thankfully, we have local folks willing to take on the challenge, so thanks again to everyone willing to serve.

          I’m Steve Sauder and there’s something to think about.