headerlogoweb103014

Something to Think About

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

Steve Sauder is president of Emporia's Radio Stations, Inc. the owners of KVOE-AM 1400, Country 101.7 and Mix 104.9. Steve has been in a leadership position with ERS, Inc., since 1987.

March 15, 2017

As I record this segment I am in a bit of a frump. I woke up this morning and realized that what Hornet Nation experienced Monday evening was real and not a bad nightmare.  Our beloved Lady Hornets lost a basketball game to an outstanding Harding team on Harding’s very hostile home court.  Emporia State went from a stretch in the first half to early in the second half when virtually every bounce went our way to a second half stretch when we could not buy a basket even when getting really good looks.  The Harding Lady Bison who have now won 30 games deserve the opportunity to advance to the elite 8 after their come from behind victory and I hope they win the National Championship.  Just like the football playoff – we may not have celebrated but we were pleased when the team that eliminated Emporia State – the Northwest Missouri Bearcats went on to win the national championship.  Speaking of deserving - the Lady Hornets were again, by circumstance, deprived of playing on their home Slaymaker Court in this regional tournament.  To their credit, I am not aware of any complaints about this situation from Coach Collins or his team.  I am sure that this most difficult scheduling conflict situation will be thoroughly considered one more time as the best possible outcome continues to be sought.

Do we have anything to be thankful for?  The answer to that question is an emphatic yes!!  This basketball loss would not be nearly as difficult if we had not been living the dream during the season.  The success of the Lady Hornets has built to a crescendo – an outstanding season followed by their phenomenal success in winning the MIAA tournament and then dramatic wins in Searcy before losing in the Championship game to Harding.

This team has continued and built upon the Lady Hornet Basketball tradition.  Seniors Kathryn Flott and Kelly Moten will both go down among the very elite group of players who have left a lasting and indelible legacy on this basketball program.  Their basketball prowess goes with their character off the court and their performance in the classroom distinguishes them even further.  Their classmate Megan Holloway joins Kathryn and Kelly as an essential contributor to their career program success.  What Megan may lack in star power she more than makes up in her true grit and her leadership in team defense and blue collar workmanship. These three seniors will graduate from Emporia State and move on from their college basketball experience both better for the opportunities they have been blessed with as well as leaving the program having contributed to an even richer tradition than when they started.

Coach Jory Collins and his staff continue to do an absolutely amazing job.  Jory’s teams’ success in wins and losses certainly tell an impressive story but the quality of the student athletes in the program as individuals tells the real story.  Next year Coach Collins could welcome back 10 honor role student/athletes from this year and new recruits are impressive.

Thank you coaches, players, fans and the entire Hornet Nation for another wonderful year of Lady Hornet basketball.

Finally one more thing I am especially thankful for – when we hit White Auditorium or go on the road we are loyal Hornet fans.  We come out of our conservative or liberal silos, our Donald or Hillary silos, our MSNBC or FOX News silos.  We are all together cheering for our home team and sharing with one another our hoped for success.

Let’s join together in finding more opportunities to share in pursuing the greater good and in celebration of success.

Remember it is always best to LISTEN, TO FIRST INQUIRE, TO SEEK TO UNDERSTAND.

I am Don Hill and that is something to think about.

February 15, 2017

After I made my decision to retire from the legislature I got involved in the Alliance for a Healthy Kansas which is a broad based statewide coalition of individuals and organizations that have come together to improve the health of  Kansans.

The first policy goal of the Alliance is to improve access to care by expanding KanCare, the Kansas Medicaid program. Alliance members include business leaders, doctors and hospitals, social service and safety net organizations, faith communities, chambers of commerce, advocates for health care consumers, and others.

Over the last eight months the Alliance has held 36 community meetings across Kansas, including one in Emporia last September that directly engaged thousands of Kansans. The work of the Alliance has confirmed that expanding KanCare impacts and will benefit all Kansans. 

Last week the House Health Committee held hearings on expanding KanCare. Doctors and leaders of community health centers and mental health centers testified that expanding KanCare will make Kansans healthier.  In addition to improved health and lower death rates, Kansans who are eligible for coverage under expansion will see reduced medical debt, better credit scores, and an improved chance of finding and keeping employment.   While there is a lot of talk about expanding KanCare providing a disincentive to work, the opposite is true.  A study of Ohio’s Medicaid expansion population found that the policy improved the expansion population’s employment status and prospects.  Area patients of Flint Hills Community Health Center and Crosswinds will benefit significantly from the expansion of KanCare.

Newman Hospital is enjoying improving stability after being designated as a critical access hospital.  Unfortunately thirty-one Kansas hospitals are considered financially vulnerable, in part because they provide millions of dollars’ of uncompensated care.

Larger hospitals in Kansas including Via Christi in Wichita and others have been forced to lay off hundreds of employees because of the failure to expand KanCare.  The League of Municipalities, has described how dozens of communities and their taxpayers must pay higher local taxes to support their hospitals because the state has not expanded KanCare.  

Expanding KanCare will provide resources to hospitals and reduce uncompensated care costs.  In turn, this will lessen the need for local taxpayers to pay higher sales, property, and district taxes to support their hospitals.  Research has shown that expansion often times means the difference between profit or loss for rural hospitals.  We cannot allow another closure like that experienced by Mercy Hospital in Independence – especially when there is a solution.

The closure  Independence hospital caused the loss of more than 190 good paying jobs.  Kansas lost 9,400 private sector jobs last year.  We cannot afford to lose any more.  Leaders of dozens of Chambers of Commerce including Emporia’s have described how expanding KanCare creates jobs, stimulates the economy, and helps businesses.   

The issue of whether or not to expand KanCare impacts every Kansas taxpayer.  To date, the state has forfeited over $1.6 billion of Kansas taxpayers’ money because we have chosen not to expand KanCare. That money could have been brought back to Kansas to create jobs, protect hospitals and local taxpayers, and most importantly to improve the health of Kansans.  Instead our tax dollars have gone to other states that have expanded.  Expanding Medicaid does not contribute to the deficit or debt because it is part of a budget neutral bill at the federal level.  At the state level, expanding KanCare would help the Legislature address our budget problems.  Other states have experienced positive budget impacts as a result of expansion.  It is projected that expanding KanCare would result in a $69.2 million net gain to the state budget in 2017.  

It is past time the Kansas Legislature votes to expand Medicaid.  I trust that will happen.  A recent American Cancer Society poll found that 82% of Kansas voters support expansion. When the legislature passes expansion What will Governor Brownback do. Well that is the subject for another day.

That is something to think about.  I am Don Hill 

March 1, 2017

My how time seems to fly by.  We have torn January and now the February pages off the 2017 calendar.  Emporia has been a beehive of activity as we have observed the 160th anniversary of our founding while seeing signs of vibrancy and growth I have not observed in the 45 years I have spent in our community. 

It is true that there will always be room for improvement but as I look around it is my observation that we are hitting on all cylinders. Lyon County and the city of Emporia are being led by an engaged electorate, quality commissioners and outstanding professional management. Long range strategic plans are in place and tax payer resources are being deployed carefully and wisely. 

Both public and private sector investments are quite evident in the area.  The property tax base is increasing and employment has risen. You can drive around town and observe the building activity which includes homes and businesses, as well as public improvements.

When I served in the legislature I shared that there was not a more education centric district in Kansas.  That district includes three public school districts, private schools, Flint Hill’s Technical College and of course Emporia State University.  These varieties of institutions all face different challenges and are presented various opportunities.  I am so impressed that Superintendants Mike Argebright, Aaron Doty and Kevin Case together with Flint Hills President Dean Hollembeak and ESU President Allison Garret work closely together for the mutual benefit of their institutions and for the greater good of our area and for the state of Kansas.

These education leaders and their governing boards owe their success prominently to dedicated educators and staff. 

The National Teachers Hall of Fame provides depth and additional meaning to our education centric reputation.

As I look around the community at the involvement of volunteer leaders and those civically engaged in any variety of endeavors, I am amazed to see the number of educators, retired educators and students preparing for a career in education.

Emporia has a well diversified economy and has seen the most growth in the agriculture value added manufacturing sector.  With the likelihood there will be more humans and pets to feed in the days and years ahead the food business in less vulnerable to economic downturns and that bodes well for the relative stability of our local economy.  The Regional Development Association continues to market and leverage our attributes to attract new employers and help existing businesses expand.

Emporia has always been a destination city.  This of course is relative but our history as university town, as a center for commerce and banking, our status as a sub-regional medical center. our location and accessibility are all fantastic.  Emporia is within 100 miles of over 90% of the population in Kansas. The number of medical specialties and treatment modalities available at Newman Regional Hospital continue to grow.

Retail, dining and entertainment opportunities are also on the rise and our downtown area and arts and entertainment area continues to grow and improve. Now with cycling and disc golf activities our claim as the best Kansas destination for the active leisure traveler is difficult to dispute.  Our Emporia Main Street organization has been the catalyst for much of the dynamism and vitality we see not only on Commercial Street but throughout the community.

I could go on and on and I probably will in coming weeks but for now I hope you get the impression I am proud of Emporia and grateful to call it home.

That is something to think about.. I am Don Hill.

February 22, 2016

Something to Think About, every Wednesday on KVOE with Steve Sauder.  I remember when Ed McKernan Jr., past owner of the radio station had his weekly words.  I always looked forward to both, didn't always agree with them, however.

When I received an email from Erren Harter asking if I would be interested in doing the show on one of the Wednesdays that Steve will be gone, I thought that it would be a neat deal,  Well let me tell you, it hasn't been as easy as I thought.

I thought maybe I would talk about Steve asking me to fill in for his leftfielder on a slow pitch softball team.  There was a high-five ball that I would normally catch well it felt to the ground when Steve was on the pitching mound.  Yes, you can picture the rest.

Or maybe I could tell you about the time Ed McKernan Sr., was broadcasting the Emporia high basketball game with Topeka high in the Dungeon with their two division one signees.  Ed broadcast the whole game with my dad playing instead of me.  By the way, we lost 63-61. I am sure that if I had played instead of my dad we would have won the game.

Oh the memories.   Life is built on memories you live for the moment you prepare and then it is gone in a split second to become a memory.

When Yordano Ventura was killed a few weeks ago it brought back memories of him in his Royals uniform, his hat cocked to the side, and the hope we Royals fans had this year for him being the big guy on the mound.  But oh my, how life can be so fragile

That accident jogged my memory to the year 1964 when a former KU track athlete silver medalist in the 400 m hurdles in the 1960 Rome Olympics and a captain in the Air Force named Cliff Cushman came back to KU to train for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.  He was favored to win the gold instead he hit a hurdle during the Olympic trials, he fell and did not qualify for the Olympics therefore this would push his dream for Gold back another four years.  For all the accolades in track he might've been better known for a letter he wrote to the students in his high school in Grand Forks, North Dakota.  It was a challenge to these young people to better themselves, cherish second chances, honor their mothers and fathers and to reach exceeding your grasp.  You can read the letter on the Internet, just Google "Cliff Cushman letter".   I have used it many times giving it to young people who experimented some heart ache in their lives.  The irony of it all was that Cliff returned to the Air Force he flew his first mission in Vietnam was shot down and is listed as missing in action.  In a brief second his hope for gold again was snuffed out.

Here are some things to think about also:

Just for Today, I will try to live through this day only, and not tackle my whole life-problem at once.

Just for Today, I will be Happy. This assumes that what Abraham Lincoln said is true, that “most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.”

Just for Today, I will try to strengthen my mind, I will study and I will learn something useful

Just for Today, I will adjust myself to what is, and not try to adjust everything to my own desires. I will take my luck as it comes, and fit myself to it.

Just for Today, I will exercise my Soul.

Just for Today, I will be agreeable. I will look as well as I can, dress as becomingly as possible,  talk low,  act courteously, be liberal with flattery, criticize not one bit nor find fault with anything, and not try to regulate nor improve anybody.

Just for Today, I will have a Program. I will write down just what I expect to do every hour. I may not follow it exactly, but I’ll have it. It will save me from the two pests Hurry and Indecision.

Just for Today, I will have a quiet half hour, all by myself, and relax. During this half hour, some time, I will try to get a little more perspective to my life.

Just for Today, I will be Unafraid. Especially I will not be afraid to be Happy, to enjoy what is Beautiful, and to believe that as I give to the world, so the world will give to me.

One last thing, a few weeks ago, I was reading a devotional by John Wooden, the great UCLA basketball coach.  It was titled 86,400.  That is how many seconds there are in a day.  They are given to us for us to use as we see fit.  We cannot pass any unused seconds to the next day.  Once they are gone they are gone.  It details about planning, using your time wisely, do not waste time, time lost is time lost, you can't make it up, if you put things off and work twice as hard the next day then you're only cheating yourself.  Life is fragile, enjoy every moment, don't cheat yourself.

Now there is Something to Think About

February 8, 2017

In Emporia, we have had the same city commission for the last 4 years. In that time, our commission has focused on maintaining the city’s financial strength, long range planning, and on development. I think we have made significant progress towards our goals, but I think the most visible area has been in development. Development can take many forms, but I thought I would focus on Housing, Infrastructure, Industrial, Commercial, and Higher Ed.

Updated housing has long been a need in Emporia, and has been on the city’s goals since 2013.  Housing can take many forms, but I wanted to focus on both single family, and multifamily. We had 20 new houses started last year, with a total cost of $3.3 million, and 247 remodeling permits with a total of $1.8 million. Last year, the commission approved the first RHID project in Emporia, opening 26 lots for construction in the new Hidden Vistas development. Of those 26 lots, 10 have commitments. The commission also supported 3 Housing Tax Credit applications that could lead to a new low to moderate income housing complex.  Finally, 2016 saw the opening of the Chelsea Lofts downtown.

Maintaining and updating the city’s infrastructure has also seen significant development. Last year, roads that were resurfaced included Hwy 50, and over 2 miles of other city road improvements. Over $750,000 was invested in our roads. We also relined over 3 miles of sanitary sewers to maintain their life expectancy, and completely rebuilt Sewer Life Station 6 in Jones Park.  The city’s award winning water also saw significant investment in a new Ozone treatment cycle, and a new main water intake line from the Neosho River, complete with zebra mussel prevention.

Industrial development and jobs are one of the backbones of our local economy. Last year, we saw higher employment at many of our major employers.  The RDA is continuously in talks with our local companies, and will look to partner in their future growth. Finally, the city used a KDOT grant to finish Warren Way in Industrial Park 3 to open the last big lot to development.

Commercial development saw 2 major projects announced, and the construction started. The Flint Hills Mall is using a 1 cent CID to rehab and modernize their facility. This is the first project of its kind in Emporia.  The Emporia Pavilions project was approved and construction began in October 2016.  This was a combination TIF/ CID project, again the first time that method has been used in Emporia.                        

The final type of development I wanted to discuss is in Higher Education. Last year, the city announced a major plan to help improve Welch Stadium at ESU through a 5 year commitment. The city also partnered with Lyon County to provide scholarship dollars to help recruit students to ESU.  The city also completed a storm water project along Merchant Street that improved the ESU landscape off of I35. 

The current city commission has focused on all types of development the last 4 years.  Progress can be seen around town. However, if you feel that there are other priorities the city should focus on, or just think things should be done differently, please remember that the next election for the city commission will be in November. If you would like to file for the election, please see the Lyon County clerk by June 1. I’m Jon Geitz, and that is something to think about.

February 1, 2017

This week seems to have barely begun and yet – does it seem to anyone other than me that we have had enough headlines for weeks.

President Trump has been busy in his first dozen days after taking the oath of office.  I believe he has taken some meaningful positive action and made other moves which cause me great concern.   Kind of reminds me of the playground game we played way back in the day – he has taken 4 scissor steps forward and several baby steps backward. 

I am especially concerned about the Presidents immigration ban and the way it was implemented.  What was he thinking about?  Who did he consult?  Were the consequences of this action, both intended and unintended, carefully considered?

In the aftermath of this action I am grateful for the wisdom and guidance from the faith community as well as counsel from leaders in business (especially the tech industry), education, homeland security and defense.

Elected officials in both parties have raised voices of concern including all of our Kansas congressional delegation.  Senator Jerry Moran and Representative Kevin Yoder responded quickly.

Senator Moran said  “ While I support thorough vetting, I do not support restricting the rights of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents  Furthermore, far-reaching national security policy should always be devised in consultation with Congress and relevant government agencies.”

Representative  Kevin Yoder  said his office will work with constituents who, as lawful permanent residents of the United States, are unfairly detained under the executive order. Yoder said he supports pausing refugee resettlement in the U.S. but opposes more expansive restrictions.

Yoder stated further that “President Trump and the White House must work with the State Department and (Department of Homeland Security) to ensure that green card holders and valid visa recipients who have already gone through vetting don’t get swept up by this order because it is interpreted too broadly.”

The higher education community in Kansas has also expressed concern.

K-States president Richard Myers, who was also chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under Republican President George W. Bush, said in a statement that Kansas State has reached out to all international students and scholars with travel advice while the ban is in place.

“K-State deeply values the contributions of our international family members and regrets the disruption this situation is causing in their lives. As a public research university with global connections, we are concerned about the detrimental effects of this policy on those pursuing academic studies and research.” said Myers.

A spokesman for prominent Kansas businessman Charles Koch said he opposed President Trump’s controversial ban on immigrants from predominantly Muslim countries.

In a statement he said "We believe it is possible to keep Americans safe without excluding people who wish to come here to contribute and pursue a better life for their families. The travel ban is the wrong approach and will likely be counterproductive,"

I understand there is disagreement regarding this issue but I believe the President has stubbed his toe on this one.  Donald J. Trump is our President.  He is my President and I wish for his success.  There is not a President in history who has not acknowledged they made mistakes while serving in the most powerful office in the world.

I believe we must all be willing to find ways to work together and I hope President Trump will be caring and careful.  We will all be best served when he finds the capacity to learn from his, and others, success as well as missteps.

That is something to think about!