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What's In Outdoors (1)

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Every Friday morning at 8:15, Phil Taunton will join the KVOE Morning show and let listeners know What’s In Outdoors.

 Below you can listen to past shows and find information relating to all kinds of stuff.  ENJOY!

PICTURES, STORIES, RECIPES, COMMENTS, QUESTIONS, AND/OR IDEAS FOR FUTURE SHOWS?

Email us – outdoors@kvoe.com 

What's In Outdoors Calendar

All Year

Kansas Crappie Club Tournaments - More Info

Apr 20-21

Rendezbous at Council Grove - https://www.facebook.com/events/566815313676531/ 

Apr 20-21

SETHFEST - https://www.facebook.com/events/405505549875329/?notif_t=plan_user_invited&notif_id=1520271902596334 

Apr 21

Youth Outdoor Education Day, part of Seth Fest at Marina Cove, Council Grove Reservoir.  

What's in Outdoors will be giving away a KDWPT lifetime fishing license - Flyer

Apr 21 

Kansas Secretary of State's 8th Annual Ad Astra Archery Tournament! - http://www.sos.ks.gov/archery/main.html 

Apr 23 & 24

Kansas Legislative Sportsmen's Caucus Annual Fishing Tournament and Sporting Clays Shoot - Flyer

May 5

Spring Fishing Clinic at Bluestem Farm and Ranch

May 12

Aquatic Education Day, Clinton Lake. - Flyer

May 20

Eric Brown, Blake Rapp, Kansas Hunting and Fishing and Pass it On Outdoor Mentors. BBBS event, Camp Alexander

June 1-3 

8th Annual Yeager/Jenkins Memorial Catfish Tournament - 

Aug 11

Outdoor Kids Day! @ Clinton State Park - Flyer - Details

          The second Saturday in September is World AFib Awareness Day. When that message arrived from KU Med it hit home with me because I have dealt with Atrial Fibrillation for about 20 years.

          AFib is the most common type of irregular heartbeat. It occurs when one or both of the upper chambers of the heart – called the atria – don’t beat the way they should. This can cause blood to pool in the left atrium, where a blood clot can form. If that clot breaks away, it can travel to the brain, where it can cause a stroke.

          AFib won’t kill you, but a stroke can, so those of us with AFib pay a lot of attention to our blood thickness. A scary fact is that 1/3 of people with AFib will have a stroke at some point.

AFib affects more than 2.7 million people in the United States. The odds of developing AFib go up with age. Amazingly, some people have AFib, but experience no symptoms.

Some of the most prevalent symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation are:

  • Racing, irregular heartbeat

  • Fluttering in the chest

  • Heart palpitations

  • Dizziness

  • Weakness

  • Chest pain

  • Shortness of breath

  • Sweating

  • Fatigue when exercising

  • Faintness

If you’d like to know more about AFib there is a not for profit organization (Global Atrial Fibrillation Alliance) founded for the purpose of bringing patients, physicians and industry together for the common goal of improving the knowledge, awareness and support for the management of AFib.  Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more info on how to get involved.

On September 13th there will be a World AFib Awareness Day at Kansas City’s Crown Center Hotel. Attendees will learn not only about diagnostic treatment and tools, but also about using things like yoga and lifestyle changes to manage AFib.  Register online at www.tinyurl.com/GAFA2014

AFib won’t kill you, but that stroke can!

I’m Steve Sauder and there’s something to think about.

Monday night’s presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was exciting, boring and predictable all at the same time.

          Judged as a debate, I think Hillary won and the Donald while scoring some good points missed several golden opportunities. They offer up so many plans it seems more like a Monopoly game than real life.

          One idea that Trump might consider concerns his unwillingness to release his tax returns and his reported ability to NOT PAY TAXES!

          I’ve been reading a book about Joseph P. Kennedy. He’s the father of President John F. Kennedy his brothers Bobby and Edward and 7 other children.

Trump should read this book called The Patriarch. It tells how Joe Kennedy manipulated business deals and especially how he absolutely raped the stock market and banks by creating investment opportunities in companies then convincing friends to join in thus driving up stock prices and then - often bailing out taking massive profits with him. Joseph P. Kennedy was a very skilled inside trader.

I don’t think he ever had to use bankruptcy, but he was accused of using funds from a bootlegging operation to fund one deal.

Here’s the rest of the story. Largely because of way Kennedy and others like him manipulated the markets and banks Franklin Roosevelt as a part of his New Deal in the thirties championed legislation to create regulations for banks and the Security and Exchange Commission to start reeling in Wall Street.

Amazingly Joe Kennedy who had all kinds of political aspirations himself lobbied for and was appointed by FDR as the first Chairman of the SEC!

This was absolutely like appointing the fox to watch the hen house!

So how does this help Trump?

Monday night when Mrs. Clinton said “Donald brags about paying no federal income taxes,” Trump utters under his breath – “I’m smart.”

My suggestion would be to cite Joe Kennedy who set the standard for insider trading on Wall Street then volunteered and was appointed to clean it up as Chairman of the SEC.

Trump should suggest if we want to collect more taxes from the rich why not ask someone who understands how to avoid taxes to be in charge of collecting them?

 He can proudly claim - and this time with some creditability, that he knows more about the flawed IRS Code than about anybody!

Don’t hold your breathe though – he had lots of opportunities Monday and swung and missed most of them.

Sadly Monday’s debate did little to help me decide how to vote. It did though motivate me to try and finish the Patriarch – its 787 pages long, but full of good stuff.

To end with some good news we are only 42 days away from the election!

I’m Steve Sauder.

Let's consider a hypothetical question today.

          What if America had a rule of No Confidence like Great Britain forcing our president to stand for re-election in November of this year?

          The question becomes could anyone defeat Donald Trump?

          Republicans threw everything and everyone they had at Trump not long ago and he beat them like a drum. His support while not growing is still strong within the party.

          So, is there a Democrat who could unite their party to take on Trump?

          A recent TIME magazine article described the Democratic Party this way: "in their deepest congressional rut since the class of 1946 was elected."

          Holding only 15 governors' mansions and that of 98 partisan state legislatures Democrats control only 31! And, during the Obama years Democrats lost 970 seats in state legislatures leaving their "bench almost bare."

          TIME quotes a Democratic strategist saying "there is no confusion about what Democrats are against - the only disagreement is what we are for."

          And therein lays the problem. The splits in both parties create groups of believers that are so polarized in their ideologies that working together is difficult if not impossible.

          If you trust the popular vote from the last election Democrats would have the best opportunity to win because they have the numbers, but can they get them together?

          Is there a unifying democratic candidate?

          Elizabeth Warren seems like the obvious choice, but TIME points out when Democrats backed progressives like Dukakis, Mondale and McGovern the results were landslide losses.

          So far efforts by the Democrats to mend their differences have been fruitless. Putting Bernie Sanders and new party chairman Tom Perez together at a recent rally resulted in Sanders followers heckling Perez.

          Could President Trump win re-election now or in 2020 is a question we Kansans should understand isn't that easy to answer. We need only to say Sam Brownback.

          These are unique times in which we live. If you aren't happy with where we are the answer is not to just complain, but to get involved and that means at minimum get registered and vote!

          I’m Steve Sauder and There’s something to think about!

        

Touchy topic today because I am as guilty as the next guy, but still often feel like a victim.

          Cell phones are everywhere and while most users think they have good mobile manners, more and more people indicate they are irritated and annoyed by the use of cell phones in public places.

          One piece I read suggested we need to really pay attention to others whenever we put our mobile devices to our ears.

Loutish cell use is out of control one person wrote. Mobile phones now ring at weddings, funerals, job interviews, surgical procedures and during Broadway shows.

As bad as those examples are the most grievous form of cell phone bad etiquette is when someone is just plain rude in the use of their phone in your presence.

Recently this rudeness was given a name and a group has been started to stop – Phubbing.

Phubbing is the act of snubbing someone in a social setting by looking at your phone rather than paying attention to them.

The Phubbing name came from someone in a pub with one other person (maybe even a date) paying more attention to their phone than the other person.

There now exists a “Stop Phubbing” campaign!

Cell phones and rude behavior are becoming pretty closely aligned.

Airplanes prior to the “turn off your mobile devices” command are rampant with loud talkers who don’t seem to notice the people around them who cannot help but hear them.

One of my pet peeves is the golf course. I take my phone, but try hard to turn the ringer down and never have an extended conversation.

All too often playing partners take calls on the golf course and simply stop playing to dispatch their business. When it is suggested this was rude to the rest of us they usually say something like “I have to make a living.”

Made me wonder if that was true – what was he doing on the golf course in the middle of the afternoon?

Like I said at the outset – I am as guilty as the next guy. But, I am trying to stop being rude when comes to my cell phone and I hope others might give this concern some consideration as well.

I’m Steve Sauder and there’s something to think about.

Wowzer! Not sure that’s a word, but I am sure Kansas has quite a race going on for the United States Senate.

          In the incumbent’s corner we have Republican Pat Roberts – the wiley veteran of 8 terms in the House of Representatives and 2 terms as a Senator from Kansas.

          The challenger is Independent candidate Greg Orman – a political unknown until recently, but a man with a plan and plenty of resources behind him.

          This will be a difficult decision for many Kansas voters.

          Senator Robert’s longevity was used against him in the hotly contested primary election where he won but failed to capture a majority of the votes.

          Robert’s has a sparkling record of leadership and accomplishment in Washington where is noted for important positions especially in agriculture, health care and defense. If he loses Kansas loses its most influential voice on the beltway.

          Orman was raised by his mother in Minnesota. He spent summers

working in his dad’s furniture store warehouse in Stanley, Kansas. He’s been an over achiever from the get-go. He earned a spot in the American Legion’s Boy’s Nation in WashingtonD.C. in 1986 and that’s where he met President Ronald Regan. He graduated from Princeton in 1991.

          Shortly after college Orman developed an efficient lighting system he built into a business he eventually sold to K C Power and Light. From that early success Greg Orman has had the golden touch starting running several very successful companies.

          Monday Orman released his required financial disclosure. The release indicated assets between $21.5 and $85.9 million and an annual income between $917,000 and $4.5 million. Taking the reported assets at their lowest number puts Greg Orman among the wealthiest U.S. Senators.

          Actually, it appears Kansans have a great choice. A long term veteran of Washington politics who is a cinch to hold a high ranking position if the Senate is controlled by Republicans; or the brash newcomer who has a knack for success and has pledged to be a problem solver in D.C. rather than a hard core politician.

          This is a tough decision. Hope you care enough to vote in November.

          I’m Steve Sauder.

 

          On September 2, my topic was the proposal for a new school facility in Northern Lyon County. You will probably remember I started by stating that I was not a patron in the district and that I understood some would feel like this was none of my business. I accepted that and shared my observations.

          My thoughts were that the proponents of the new school had done a good job of trying to inform the voters. That there was a list of economic reasons to build the new facility including: gigantic transportation savings; classroom size efficiency that included an actual fifth grade example that would result annual savings in the $50 thousand range; energy savings and more.

          The reaction to my effort was a number of “thank you” notes from supporters and a few comments from others.

          There have been letters in the Gazette both for and against the bond issue. This has the looks of a tough decision that would be made by an informed electorate.

          Then Saturday I opened up my Gazette. The paper’s Editor& Publisher decided to weigh in on the bond election.

          Chris Walker is opposed suggesting “the tax increase would be insane.” He talked about people possibility being “shunned” if they voted no and let all know he’s voting no on October 7th.

          Chris is certainly within his rights to oppose the bond issue and say so using his mode, but something you may or may not know makes me wonder about his motives. 

          While the Walkers are USD 251 District patrons I think their children attend school elsewhere - makes one wonder.

If the USD 251 bond passes more Emporia kids will likely consider the new, smaller and closer school. That could raise my taxes. 

          North Lyon County voters have a major decision to make. Good Luck!         

          I’m Steve Sauder

          Colin Kaepernick created quite a firestorm when he first chose to sit down during the playing of our national anthem. Of course his complaint was to “not show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color.”

          He has been called everything from non-patriotic to entitled. Some athletes have joined him while others have gone the other way.

          Time magazine asks the question: Should the national anthem be played at sporting events anyway?

          I was surprised to learn that this is not the custom in most other countries except Canada and in Olympic type situations.

          Time pointed out we don’t start the Academy Awards show with the Star Spangled Banner nor Broadway shows and most other events.

          Baseball gets credit for both the first playing of the national anthem before a game in 1862 and starting the tradition at baseball games which seems to have started with the World Series in 1918 when America was swelling with World War I pride. But even then the practice of playing this song was still reserved for big events like the World Series.

          Time points out that often the flag waving and troops showing up at sporting events has been paid for by contracts between sporting teams and the Department of Defense. That’s interesting!

          I choose to remember how meaningful our national anthem became after 9-11 and how patriotism seems to trump just about all other bad habits for Americans. No doubt we go overboard at times – the MIAA, the Athletic Conference ESU participares in started a practice of playing the national anthem not once, but twice at all double header basketball games!

          Given the times we live in I like the playing or singing of our national song at sporting events and it seemed very appropriate at the ESU Presidential Inauguration last week.

          Different athletes have reacted in different ways – that’s fine – that’s what makes America unique.

          To end I will lift up J’den Cox’s story. J’den is a University of Missouri graduate from Columbia, Missouri who recently won a Bronze Medal in the Olympic Games in wrestling. Upon his return home he sought and was given permission to sing the national anthem before Missouri’s home football game last Saturday. He said it was an easy thing to do and he loved it.

          J’den didn’t mention anything about protests and such he just let his actions speak for him.

          Good example for us all.

God Bless the USA!
I’m Steve Sauder.  

          Local service clubs like the Lions Club, Kiwanis, Optimist, Sertoma and Rotary matter. Each contributes locally and on a larger scale world-wide.

          The Lions concentrate on sight and vision having been challenged by Helen Keller in 1925.

          Kiwanis is about "building" with helping kids their stated mission.

          The Optimist strive to make a difference for kids and their communities.

          Locally Sertoma is known for their "Little Train" and putting up flags while hearing is their overriding mission.

          If the groups just mentioned want equal time it will be available but, today I'm talking about Rotary International and its' world-wide effort to eradicate Polio.

          In the 30's, 40's and 50's Polio was a feared disease. An infection causing paralysis and death it was most common in the summer months.

          Also known as Infantile Paralysis its treatment was to be the sole beneficiary of our Jones Trust in the 50's. In 1955 the  Salk vaccine was introduced and has been successful in eliminating polio from most of the world, but the task is not complete and Rotary continues the fight it started in 1979 to totally eradicate this dread disease.

          After Rotary’s initial effort in '79 they got serious in 1985 introducing PolioPlus with a goal of raising $120 million to immunize every child in the world.  By 1988 $247 million had been raised!!

          By 2003 the effort was gaining traction a new goal resulted in $135 million additional being raised including a million dollars from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

          The Gates’ were just warming up! In 2007 they challenged Rotary with a $100 million challenge.

          Today just three countries have active poliovirus - Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria. Treating children in those countries is difficult because they each have much bigger issues than health to deal with.

          The numbers are staggering! At the recent Rotary International Convention the organization announced along with the Gates Foundation pledging an additional $450 million dollars for the effort.

          Even though last year there were only 19 reported cases of polio worldwide and 8 cases so far this year - the fight goes on. You see if the virus remains anywhere it can spread back to the places where it has already been cleared. The battle is not won yet. The U.S has been polio free since 1979. To date the efforts of Rotary and Gates have immunized over 2 ½ billion children!

          Service clubs like Emporia's Rotary, Lions, Kiwanis, Optimist and Sertoma would be sorely missed if not active. They do matter!

          I'm Steve Sauder.

The recent Supreme Court appointment by Governor Brownback seems to have raised little, if any attention by voters. Governor Brownback chose his former Chief of Staff and recent appointee to the Kansas Court of Appeals, Caleb Stegall for the post over Court of Appeals Judge Karen Arnold-Burger, and Emporia’s Merlin Wheeler, the Chief Judge of the 5th District covering Lyon and Chase Counties.

Brownback’s selection of Stegall was not unexpected, but certainly did open him up for criticism for making an obvious political choice over candidates many thought were most qualified.

Paul Davis and Anthony Hensley and a host of other Democrats, of course were critical. Ryan Wright with the Kansas Value Institute said “Brownback placed trust in the least qualified and least experienced nominee.”

Several critics said the obvious choice was Arnold Burger because of her Court of Appeals experience. Plus being a female she would have helped with gender balance since the Supreme Court is under represented by women.

Once again our Governor did not choose to be obvious, smart or clever. He appointed his friend and former aide.

Monday’s Gazette carried a story from the Wichita Eagle suggesting the ”Judicial selection system worked.”

Interesting!

Unlike Court of Appeals selections the Governor did consider candidates proposed to him from the Kansas Nominating Commission. It appears the Commission did their job selecting: Stegall, a bright new face; Wheeler a tried and trusted, long serving veteran; and Arnold- Burger a well qualified female with next level experience.

Agreed, the system worked.

Governor Brownback did nothing wrong, he just was predictable.

A true test for the Governor will be if he gets re-elected if he tries to eliminate the Nominating Commission for the Supreme Court.

Locally we won by not losing Merlin Wheeler who is an outstanding judge.

The Governor should have taken a longer look. He missed a good opportunity to pick a good man.

I’m Steve Sauder

Very impressed was my reaction to Emporia Board of Education’s applicants for the open spot on their board when Brent Windsor left.

          No less than six people applied – that was awesome! Thank you to: Jennifer Dalton; Shilo Good; Melissa Reed; Jeff Lutes; Iona Moore and the eventual selectee: Colleen Mitchell.

          Your willingness to serve was amazing. Especially given the difficulties facing K-12, public education in Kansas. Running a school district has long been hard work, but when you add in the messes our Kansas legislature and governor have created you have to wonder why anyone would want to serve?

          Look at the challenges being faced in North and South Lyon County and Chase County and you get a better understanding of what our school leaders are facing. Thanks to all that serve and thanks again to the applicants for the USD 253 opening.

          And, wow! What a great selection in Colleen Mitchell! Over thirty years of teaching experience and to say she was a good teacher would be a massive understatement! She was the Kansas Teacher of the Year in 2013 and a Master Teacher as well. She’s also part of a family that does business in our community thus giving her appreciation for things like property taxes and expenses.

          Colleen won’t be the only former teacher on the Board, but adding her experience will help non-teachers better understand. And, she too will get an education as to the challenges faced by school administrators. This has to be a win/win situation.

          Why would anyone want to serve on a public school Board of Education?

While local control is always talked about our state and federal governing bodies have perfected the art of mandating programs or requirements, but often without proper funding?

          Thankfully, we have local folks willing to take on the challenge, so thanks again to everyone willing to serve.

          I’m Steve Sauder and there’s something to think about.